When I first got my hands on a red berry, I did not know how to use it. There are so many varieties of berries that are so delicious and sweet, but how to use them? Red berries are usually eaten in the summer. We can use red berries in different ways like as a soup, jam, yogurt, juice or even desserts. Red berries are very nutritious, they contain a lot of vitamins and they are low in calories.

Red berry desserts are very common, but there are many variations. Red berry desserts are generally made of red berries, sugar, and milk that is heated to a high temperature. The most common red berry desserts are red jelly, red jelly and waffles, red jelly ice cream, red jelly and cake, red jelly and hot milk, red jelly and ice cream, red jelly and cakes, and red jelly ice cream and cakes. Red berry desserts are made of raspberry, red currant, black currant, strawberry, or red raspberry.

I wanted to share with you my favorite red berry dessert, a traditional German sweet that is often made in summertime and is very popular in my homeland. It is called rotkäse (red cheese). It is a very simple dessert to prepare, but it has a very special taste that is difficult to describe. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

1629406985_743_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-Dessert

Rote Grütze (also known as Rdgrd) Is A Simple Dessert With Incredible Color And Flavor!

Look no farther than Rote Grütze for a traditional German and Danish dessert. This traditional red berry dessert – Rote Grutze in North America – is a little sweet, a little sour, and a whole lot of deliciousness!

This is a popular dish in Germany and Denmark. Lisa had spent three years in Denmark and was no stranger to Rdgrd med flde!

In reality, for non-native Danish speakers, the phrase rdgrd med flde may be difficult to say. So, as a fun tidbit, it was often used as a tongue twister by Lisa’s Danish friends!

red berries rote grütze with cream in clear bowlsOur Rote Grütze came out beautifully!

Rote Grütze, like fruit pudding, may be served with a variety of toppings, such as whipped cream or vanilla sauce!

Recipe Suggestions

Traditionally, berries like German raspberries and red currants, as well as cherries, are used to make Rote Grütze. These days, though, it may be prepared with whichever fruit is in season.

In fact, you may make this dessert with either fresh or frozen fruit. When using fresh fruit instead of frozen fruit, you may need to use a little bit extra liquid.

You should have a bag of frozen mixed berries in your freezer so you can create this red berry dessert whenever you want.

It’s also a wonderful way to use up any fresh berries that have become mushy and are no longer edible on their own.

Sprinkle some granulated sugar on top or cover the Rote Grütze with cling film to prevent a skin from developing on the dessert as it cools in the fridge. The cling film should come in contact with the berries rather than simply covering the dish.

1629406988_959_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertThe thickness and general texture of Rote Grütze are fantastic!

Step-by-Step Instructions for Making Rote Grütze

The recipe card for this extremely red berry dessert may be found at the bottom of this article.

The recipe process pictures are below for those who want to follow along with visuals.

This way, if you have any questions when preparing it at home, you may refer to how we did it!

1629406989_108_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertGet the fruit ready.

Prepare the fruit first. If you’re using fresh fruit, make sure it’s washed and dried before using it. Remove the pits, stems, and other unwanted parts, and chop them into smaller pieces if required (e.g. for strawberries).

Remove the frozen berries from the freezer if you’re using them. You may need to chop some of the fruit into smaller pieces depending on the fruit you’re using.

We used a package of frozen mixed berries, which included raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and strawberries, to photograph the dish.

1629406990_834_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertFill a saucepan halfway with fruit juice.

In a medium-sized saucepan, pour the fruit juice. If you don’t have any red fruit juice on hand, water will suffice.

If that’s the case, you may wish to add some additional sugar, vanilla extract, or even lemon juice afterwards to enhance the taste.

1629406991_784_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertCombine the fruit juice and cornstarch in a mixing bowl.

Combine cornstarch and 3-4 tablespoons of the fruit juice from the saucepan in a small bowl.

1629406992_615_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertCombine, combine, combine!

Continue to stir until the cornstarch has completely dissolved.

1629406994_453_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertPour in the sugar and vanilla essence.

Return to the fruit juice saucepan and stir in the sugar and vanilla essence.

We don’t typically use a lot of sugar, so the red berry dish isn’t very sweet on its own. Feel free to add extra sugar if you want it to taste sweeter!

Bring the mixture to a boil, then turn off the burner.

1629406995_465_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertCombine the cornstarch and the water in a mixing bowl.

Pour in the dissolved cornstarch while continuously whisking to prevent lumps from developing.

1629406996_61_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertToss in the berries.

Fill the saucepan with fresh or frozen berries. Stir carefully to avoid breaking any berries.

1629406997_827_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertCook the berries in a saucepan.

Return the saucepan to the hot burner and cook the berries for a few minutes on low heat. Because frozen berries must thaw first, it will take somewhat longer than fresh berries.

1629406999_173_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertContinue to cook until you’re satisfied with the consistency.

Remove the saucepan from the heat after the berries have reached the desired consistency (we don’t like them too mushy, but that’s a personal choice).

Don’t worry if it still seems liquidy; as it cools, it will become firmer.

In bowls, pour or ladle the Rote Grütze. Sprinkle some granulated sugar on top or cover the berry dessert with cling film to prevent a skin from developing.

1629407000_8_Rote-Grutze-Red-Berry-DessertOur Rote Grütze was served with a dollop of not-whipped cream!

Chill the dishes in the refrigerator.

Cold unwhipped cream, vanilla sauce, vanilla ice cream, or whipped cream may be served on top.

Storage Suggestions

Refrigerate the dessert until you’re ready to eat it to keep it stiff. Leftovers will keep in the fridge for up to two days.

Simply cover the bowls with a lid or cling film before serving. Because the dessert’s texture may change after a few days owing to the starch, we don’t suggest storing leftovers for more than a few days.

Our advice is to wait until you’re ready to eat to add cream or another topping to the berries.

FAQ

In Rote Grütze, which fruit should I use?

Raspberries, red currants, blackberries, and cherries are the most popular fruits. Other berries, such as strawberries or blueberries, may, of course, be added.

Do I make Rote Grütze using fresh or frozen fruit?

Both types of fruit are useful. When using fresh fruit rather than frozen fruit, you may need to add a little extra liquid. This is due to the fact that when frozen fruit thaws, it loses water.

With what should Rote Grütze be served?

Vanilla sauce, ice cream, cold unwhipped cream, or whipped cream are some of the toppings or sauces that may be served with Rote Grütze.

Recipes that are similar

Check out these other sweet treat recipes if you’re looking for more delectable sweets!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh or frozen mixed berries (see notes)
  • a third of a cup of red fruit juice
  • 1 teaspoon extract de vanille
  • 2–3 teaspoons of sugar (more to taste)
  • cornstarch, 3–4 teaspoons

Instructions

  1. If you’re using fresh fruit, make sure it’s washed and dried before using it. Remove the pits, stems, and other debris, then chop them into smaller pieces as needed (e.g. when using strawberries). Remove the frozen berries from the freezer if you’re using them.
  2. In a medium-sized saucepan, pour the red fruit juice.
  3. Combine the cornstarch and 3-4 tablespoons of the fruit juice from the saucepan in a small bowl. Stir until the cornstarch is completely dissolved.
  4. In a mixing bowl, combine the sugar and vanilla extract with the fruit juice. Bring the mixture to a boil, then turn off the burner. While whisking continuously, pour in the dissolved cornstarch.
  5. Toss in the fresh or frozen berries with the thickened fruit juice in the saucepan. Stir carefully to avoid breaking any berries. Return the saucepan to the hot burner and cook the berries for a few minutes on low heat. Frozen berries will take somewhat longer to defrost than fresh berries.
  6. Pour or ladle the Rote Grütze into dishes after the berries have reached your desired consistency. Don’t worry if it still seems liquidy; as it cools, it will become firmer. To prevent skin from developing, sprinkle sugar on top of the berries or cover them with cling film (it should touch the top of the berries). Chill the dishes in the refrigerator.
  7. Rote Grütze may be served with ice cream, vanilla sauce, vanilla ice cream, or regular whipped cream.

Notes

  • Traditionally, raspberries, red currants, and cherries were used to make Rote Grütze. Nowadays, any berry (even seasonal fruit) is permitted. We typically prepare it using raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, and blueberries from a package of mixed frozen berries.
  • Because frozen berries lose a lot of moisture while thawing in the pot, you may need a little extra liquid when using fresh berries.
  • If you don’t have any fruit juice on hand, water will suffice. You may want to add a little more sugar, vanilla extract, or even a squeeze of lemon juice to give it a little more flavor (if you like a sour taste).
  • If the consistency isn’t just perfect, start with three tablespoons of cornstarch and add the fourth (dissolved in a little amount of water) afterward.
Information about nutrition:

Serving Size: 4 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size 143 calories 0g total fat 0g Saturated Fat 0g trans fat 0g of unsaturated fat 0 mg cholesterol 26 milligrams sodium 34 g carbohydrate 5 g of fiber 21 g sugar 1 gram of protein

An online nutrition calculator was used to determine this nutritional information. It should only be used as a guideline and not as a substitute for expert dietary guidance. Depending on the particular components used, the exact values may vary.

How did this recipe turn out for you?

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Rote Grütze (Red Berry Dessert) | I don’t know what red berry desserts are, but I was told that I have to make it for my edu-blog about food. It’s a dessert that is very popular in the north of Germany. It has to be made with local ingredients and is usually eaten plain with a spoon.. Read more about rote grütze history and let us know what you think.