Traditional Hungarian Goulash | Makes 6-8 servings. Ingredients: 3 lbs lean beef chunks (2-3 inches in size) 1/2 large onion, chopped 1 lb stewed sliced cabbage 1 cup of broth 2 tbs butter 2 tbs flour 1/4 tsp black pepper Instructions: Season beef with salt and pepper. In a large skillet, brown the beef in the butter over medium high heat. Add onion and cabbage and cook, stirring frequently, for about 10 minutes, until the cabbage has softened. Stir in the broth, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and cook for about 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Add butter and

Goulash is a country-style stew that is cooked using paprika, garlic, and paprika. In Hungarian cuisine, Goulash is cooked using pork meat and is often served with bread.

Hungarian goulash is a classic Hungarian dish that is usually prepared with beef or pork. (Before we get to the recipe, here are a few Hungarian facts that you might want to know: The Hungarian language is the most and only official language in Hungary, which is one of the most populated countries in Europe. This is because of the huge number of Hungarians that immigrated from the country. The official language is a mixture of German, Latin, Turkish, Farsi and French which is called Magyar. The country has a rich culinary heritage and the dishes are very popular. There are several traditional dishes that originated from the country, the most well known being the goulash. The goulash is a combination stew of meat

Traditional-Hungarian-Goulash

1629407369_764_Traditional-Hungarian-Goulash

Here’s a recipe for Hungarian Goulash that my Hungarian grandmother used to make!

Hungarian goulash is a dish that brings pleasure and pleasant emotions of comfort to certain Europeans.

Goulash, also known as gulyás or “gulyásleves” (leves meaning soup), is a paprika-rich soup prepared with substantial but basic ingredients like as potatoes, carrots, onions, and meat.

You can’t miss Hungarian beef goulash because of its distinctive red hue, which comes from paprika, a major component in Hungarian cuisine.

white bowl of red hungarian goulash on wooden board with bread behindWith some excellent bread, soak up some Hungarian goulash soup!

Eric grew up eating goulash, so it’s something he’s familiar with. The Hungarian goulash recipe below was handed down to Eric’s mother by his Mama (a Hungarian grandmother who immigrated to Canada from Hungary).

Coming home after a long day of playing in the snow in Canada was nothing like coming home to a steaming hot dish of goulash!

Eric was really suggested a spot to eat genuine goulash the first time he visited Budapest, Hungary’s capital.

The tiny cafe/bar did not disappoint, dishing us a bowl of goulash soup with a lovely piece of bread, exactly like Mama used to cook.

Recipe Tips & Substitutions

Here are a few things to think about/know before you start making a large pot of goulash:

  • For goulash soup, you’ll need a nice “stewing beef.” This refers to a beef cut that is suitable for slow cooking and absorbs moisture effectively. This may be a cut of beef from the round, flank, or chuck. A piece of meat with excellent marbling will enable some natural fat to enter the soup.
  • This dish is a spin-off of a classic Hungarian goulash. You may, however, include more/different veggies. The inclusion of red peppers is a common variant (also known as capsicum or bell peppers for the North Americans). Because they soften up quicker than the potatoes and carrots, toss them in after the potatoes and carrots. Other families have even included celery or parsnip — goulash has a lot of regional/family variations.
  • Another option for making this goulash more genuine is to replace the oil with lard (particularly pig fat). Because pork fat was readily accessible, it would have been utilized. A basic oil that isn’t olive oil will suffice.
  • Paprika comes in a variety of varieties (ground-up red pepper spice). Hungarian sweet paprika is a traditional Hungarian spice (despite its name, it does not have a sweet flavor). There’s also “smoked paprika” and variants with a spicier, hotter flavor. We use genuine Szeged paprika in our recipe, but if you can’t locate Hungarian paprika, you may use regular paprika or smoked paprika from the grocery store.
  • When it comes to spices, you may flavor the goulash using whole or ground caraway seeds. Caraway is often used in regional cuisine, although some people hate the taste and smell of it. We also don’t use it in our goulash too often. Some people prefer to add bay leaves and then remove them once the dish has simmered.

1629407372_307_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashThis beef goulash dish is delicious and simple to prepare.

Step-by-Step Instructions for Making Hungarian Goulash

You may follow the recipe process pictures in this section to create this genuine Hungarian goulash dish. You’ll be able to watch precisely how we prepare our goulash soup this way.

If you’re comfortable with the general recipe procedure, you may skip to the bottom of the page to discover the specific recipe card!

1629407373_730_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashPrepare the veggies by cutting them up.

To begin, finely cut the onion, carrots, and potatoes. Remove the veggies and set them aside.

1629407375_987_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashCut the meat into small pieces.

If the stewing meat hasn’t previously been chopped into bite-size pieces, do it now.

1629407376_998_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashThe onion should be sautéed.

In a big saucepan, heat the oil and sauté the onion for 5-10 minutes on medium heat, until transparent.

1629407377_935_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashToss in the meat.

Now it’s time to add the meat.

1629407379_914_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashBrown the meat in a skillet.

Sauté until the meat is partly done and browned. To prevent the meat from sticking too much, stir it periodically.

1629407380_432_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashPour the broth in.

Reduce the heat to low and add 2 cups of broth until the mixture is fully coated. If two cups isn’t enough, add a tablespoon or two more until the meat is well coated.

1629407381_520_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashSeason with paprika and pepper.

Toss in the paprika and season with salt and salt and pepper to taste.

Place the cover on the saucepan and cook the meat for one hour on low heat, or until it is tender.

1629407383_480_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashAdd the carrots and potatoes, chopped.

Add the diced carrots and potatoes after the meat is soft. Add another cup of broth to completely cover the carrots and potatoes. If you want, you may use water instead.

1629407384_615_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashCarrots and potatoes should be cooked.

Cook, stirring occasionally, until the carrots and potatoes are tender. Make sure the potatoes aren’t overcooked. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

1629407385_294_Traditional-Hungarian-GoulashNothing but potatoes, carrots, meat, onions, and paprika!

Remove the saucepan from the heat and serve the goulash while it is still hot.

You may eat this simple Hungarian goulash in a variety of ways. With a couple pieces of fresh thick-cut crusty bread, it’s delicious.

To make the soup more full, goulash may also be served with egg noodles/dumplings (called Nokedli or spaetzle) or Hungarian pinched noodles (Csipetke).

If you’re thinking “I’d prepare a thick version and serve it with boiled potatoes or Nokedli,” you’re probably thinking about Marhapörkölt, a Swedish beef stew. Both are delicious, but we think of goulash as a soup rather than a meat stew.

Storage Suggestions

Goulash soup leftovers may be stored in the fridge in a sealed container after it has cooled. It may persist up to three days in this state.

You may reheat the goulash by placing it in a saucepan and heating it on the stovetop, or you can microwave individual servings. Because the meat and veggies collect water/broth over time in the fridge, you may need to add a little extra to the pot.

You may also prepare a large batch of goulash with the aim of freezing the leftovers, since goulash freezes nicely. Place the chilled goulash in a freezer container that is well shut. It will keep for up to three months in the freezer.

You may defrost a container the night before by taking it out of the freezer. You can then reheat it on a low heat setting on the stove or in the microwave.

FAQ

What is the definition of Hungarian Goulash?

Hungarian goulash, also known as gulyásleves, is a traditional soup from modern-day Hungary’s nomadic plains people/Magyar herders. Although there are numerous variants and ingredients used, it is most frequently prepared using meat, potatoes, carrots, onions, and paprika.

What’s the closest thing to Hungarian Goulash?

There are several Eastern European soups that are comparable to Hungarian goulash, which is unsurprising. Similar (and somewhat different) versions of the dish may be found all across the area, including the Czech Republic and Romania/Transylvania.

What kind of meat should you use in Hungarian Goulash?

In goulash, stewing beef cuts are often utilized. Stewing beef is typically chuck or round beef that has been chopped into smaller pieces and stewed in liquid until soft and tender.

What should you serve with Hungarian Goulash?

Goulash soup is traditionally served with a thick piece of crusty bread. However, adding some egg noodles/dumplings to the soup will make it more full.

What makes Hungarian Goulash different from American Goulash?

When compared to Hungarian goulash, American goulash is a totally different recipe. Ground beef and macaroni noodles are used in American goulash, which is more like a thickened stew. True goulash is a beef-based soup with potatoes, carrots, and paprika.

Recipes that are similar

Check out these delicious meal ideas for more excellent Hungarian recipes:

Ingredients

  • 1 pound stewing beef, cut into 1/2-1 inch bite-size pieces
  • 1 onion, big
  • 1 cup carrots, chopped (approximately one big carrot)
  • 2 CUP CRUMBLED POTATOES (about 2 MEDIUM/LARGE POTATOES)
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 3 quarts beef stock
  • 1 heaping spoonful paprika (Hungarian) (more to taste)
  • season with salt to taste
  • pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Cut the meat, onion, carrots, and potatoes into tiny pieces. Remove the veggies and set them aside. While the meat is cooking, you may cut the potatoes and carrots afterward.
  2. In a big saucepan, heat the oil and sauté the onion for 5-10 minutes on medium heat, until transparent.
  3. Add the meat and heat until it is partly done and browned. To prevent the meat from sticking too much, stir it periodically.
  4. Reduce the heat to low and add 2 cups of broth until the mixture is fully coated. If two cups isn’t enough, add a tablespoon or two more until the meat is well coated.
  5. Toss in the paprika and season with salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Place the cover on the saucepan and cook the meat for one hour on low heat, or until it is tender.
  7. Add the diced carrots and potatoes after the meat is soft. Add another cup of broth to completely cover the carrots and potatoes. If you want, you may use water instead.
  8. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the carrots and potatoes are tender. Make sure the potatoes aren’t overcooked.
  9. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  10. Remove the goulash from the fire and serve it alone or with crusty bread or noodles.

Notes

  • If you don’t have beef broth on hand, you may use vegetarian broth. In any event, the meat and paprika will provide a wonderful taste to the soup.
  • When using salty broth, you generally don’t need to add much additional salt.
  • Paprika comes in a variety of varieties. Sweet Hungarian paprika is often used in Hungarian cuisine. It imparts a dark crimson color to the soup as well as a distinct taste. It’s often seen in European delis. If you can’t find sweet Hungarian paprika, you may use smoked paprika or ordinary paprika from your local supermarket. If you have the option, we suggest using real Hungarian paprika.
Information about nutrition:

Serving Size: 4 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size 217 calories 9g total fat 2g Saturated Fat 0g trans fat 6 g of unsaturated fat 18 milligrams of cholesterol 861mg sodium 25g carbohydrate 4 g fiber 4 g sugar 11 g protein

An online nutrition calculator was used to determine this nutritional information. It should only be used as a guideline and not as a substitute for expert dietary guidance.

How did this recipe turn out for you?

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In Hungarian, goulash means “mixture.” It’s a great way to describe a traditional Hungarian recipe. It’s a stew dish that can be enjoyed for lunch or dinner in the summer months.. Read more about hungarian goulash soup and let us know what you think.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best paprika for Hungarian goulash?

The best paprika for Hungarian goulash is a sweet, mild paprika.

What is the difference between Hungarian goulash and beef stew?

Hungarian goulash is a stew made with meat and vegetables, while beef stew is made with meat and vegetables.

What do Hungarians call goulash?

Goulash is a traditional Hungarian dish made of meat, vegetables, and paprika.