[DETAILS] When we go to a German Restaurant, we are not only dealing with the food but also with the German culture with its famous food and drinks.

Pfannkucken (German Pancakes) | The four basic ingredients of pfannkucken • 1 cup flour • 1/2 cup milk • 1 egg • 1 tsp sugar • 1 tsp baking powder • 100 g butter or margarine • salt rinsed and ground • oil for frying • sugar for syrup

If you haven’t heard of pfannkucken , you should know that the Germans have a word for it: Pfannkuchen . And no, it’s not just because they pronounce it “fann-kuck-en” like a duck quacks. The reason for the name is that the term literally means “pot pan”, i.e., a flat pan with a handle. The origin of this tradition is quite interesting, and its history is well documented in various books.

Traditional German Pancakes with a Classic Pfannkuchen Recipe!

Do you have a sweet tooth yet are feeling a bit sluggish? German pancakes seem to be the answer for you!

They’re also known as Pfannkuchen in German, and they’re quick and simple to prepare.

These thin German pancakes may be served sweet in a variety of ways, including jam, fruit, cinnamon, and sugar, or hazelnut cocoa spread!

german pancake rolled with jam with berries and jam behind on plateOur German pancakes – one with jam and one with cinnamon & sugar!

In Germany, pancakes are known by a variety of names (many of which are determined by location). Eierkuchen, Palatschinken, and even Plinse are other names for them.

We’re calling them Pfannkuchen since Lisa grew up eating German pancakes and recognizes them as Pfannkuchen.

You may create pancakes that are a bit thinner and larger than fluffy “North American buttermilk pancakes” using this recipe.

They are, however, often thicker than a thin French crepe or a Hungarian Palacsinta. Here’s some additional information about pancake names that are perplexing…

Dutch Baby Pancakes vs. German Pancakes

Those seeking for a German pancake recipe may be looking for a Dutch Baby pancake recipe, therefore it’s essential to clarify: they’re two distinct things in our situation.

This post’s recipe is for “German Pancakes,” which is how pancakes are eaten in Germany.

The Dutch Baby is a baked German pancake with raised walled sides that is more akin to a Yorkshire pudding than a traditional German pancake.

A Dutch Baby Pancake has no ties to Germany other than the fact that it was invented in the United States and was inspired by German pancakes (this recipe).

According to legend, the kid of the restaurant who developed the dish mispronounced “Deutsch” (the German term for “German”) and mistook it for “Dutch” in Seattle.

Some people refer to the Dutch Baby Pancake as “German Pancakes,” which some Germans find amusing since it has nothing to do with Germany and is not eaten there. Dutch Baby pancakes are a product of the United States.

Both are undoubtedly wonderful in their own right, but they are two quite distinct compositions. So, this isn’t a recipe for Dutch Baby… but a recipe for classic German pancakes in the manner in which they are consumed in Germany!

Suggestions/Substitutions for the Recipe

Have a quick look through these recipe suggestions and alternatives before you start frying up some pancakes:

  • Make careful to thoroughly combine the ingredients in the batter to avoid flour lumps in your pancakes.
  • Some individuals in Germany make their pancakes fluffier by adding sparkling water to the batter. You may attempt this if you have carbonated water on hand. In such case, just remember to use less milk. Don’t worry if you don’t have sparkling water on hand; we’ll make do with a pinch of baking powder instead.
  • You may make Apfelpfannkuchen by adding apples to this recipe (German Apple Pancakes).
  • In the pan, we prefer to use a neutral-tasting oil, although butter may also be used. If you’re using butter, keep an eye on the heat in your skillet since butter may brown fast, which isn’t what we want here.

Step-by-Step Instructions for Making Pfannkuchen

If you’re curious in how to create Pfannkuchen, the recipe card is at the bottom of this page.

This part contains step-by-step directions with pictures for people who want to see how the recipe is made.

If you’re new to cooking German pancakes, this will give you an idea of how to approach the recipe.

1629407014_251_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesIn a mixing dish, combine the ingredients.

In a medium-sized mixing basin, combine the flour, salt, and baking powder.

1629407015_707_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesCombine the ingredients in a mixing bowl.

Slowly pour in the milk while beating with your electric mixer’s regular beaters or a hand whisk. Continue to mix until no lumps remain.

After that, add the eggs and mix once more. After that, cover the bowl with a dishtowel and let aside for about 15 minutes.

1629407017_60_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesIn a pan, heat the oil.

In a medium-sized frying pan, heat a little amount of oil or butter.

Once the pan is heated, pour in one ladle of pancake batter and gently tilt/rock the pan around so that the batter spreads evenly across the pan and does not get too thick in the center.

1629407018_700_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesWait until bubbles start to appear.

Fry the pancake on one side over medium heat until bubbles emerge and the pancake seems to be more done.

It’s time to flip the pancake if it’s simple to lift it with a flipper.

1629407019_614_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesCook the opposite side of the steak.

Cook the second side of the pancake until it is barely browned.

1629407020_141_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesPlace the pancake on a dish and set it aside.

Take the pancake out of the skillet and place it on a platter.

To create the next pancake, add another ladle of dough. Remember to add additional oil or butter if necessary.

Rep the procedures until all of the batter has been utilized.

1629407022_39_Pfannkucken-German-PancakesGerman pancakes are ready to eat!

In Germany, pancakes are usually topped with sugar and cinnamon, or jam or hazelnut cocoa spread.

It’s entirely up to you whether you roll your pancake or just flip it over and eat it with a fork and knife.

Storage Suggestions

We suggest eating the pancakes right away and only preparing as many as you need. It’s simply how they taste best.

As a result, we don’t suggest keeping additional pancakes in the fridge since they tend to harden, but if you do have leftovers, you may. Just be sure you eat them within 1-2 days after receiving them.

They may be reheated in the microwave or in a skillet on the stove.

FAQ

In German, how do you pronounce pancake?

Pfannkuchen is the German word for pancake. It’s pronounced somewhat like “Fan-cooH-hen.”

What makes a Dutch Baby Pancake different from a German Pancake?

A Dutch Baby Pancake is a big, baked, rising pancake in the style of a Yorkshire pudding. A typical German pancake is a crepe-like flat, pan-fried pancake.

Recipes that are similar

Check out some more sweet and savory treats if you enjoyed this recipe for German pancakes:

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour (all-purpose)
  • a quarter teaspoon of baking powder
  • a generous teaspoon of salt
  • 2 eggs, big
  • 3/4 gallon of milk
  • For frying, use oil or butter.

Instructions

  1. In a medium mixing basin, combine the flour, salt, and baking powder.
  2. Slowly pour in the milk while beating with your electric mixer’s regular beaters or a hand whisk. Continue to mix until no lumps remain.
  3. Mix in the eggs one more.
  4. Cover the basin with a dishtowel and let the mixture rest for about 15 minutes.
  5. In a medium-sized frying pan, heat a little amount of oil or butter. Once the pan is heated, pour in one ladle of pancake batter and gently tilt/rock the pan around so that the batter spreads evenly across the pan and does not get too thick in the center.
  6. Fry the pancake on one side over medium heat until bubbles emerge and the pancake seems to be more done. It’s time to flip the pancake if it’s simple to lift it with a flipper.
  7. Cook the second side of the pancake until it is barely browned. Take the pancake out of the skillet and place it on a platter.
  8. To create the next pancake, add another ladle of dough. Remember to add additional oil or butter if necessary. Rep the procedures until all of the batter has been utilized.
  9. In Germany, pancakes are usually topped with sugar and cinnamon, or jam or hazelnut cocoa spread. It’s entirely up to you whether you roll your pancake or just flip it over and eat it with a fork and knife.

Notes

  • People in Germany occasionally add a splash of sparkling water to their pancakes to make them fluffy, since sparkling water is widely available. We don’t normally do this since we know that people in North America don’t always have sparkling water on hand, but you may try it if you like – just use less milk!
  • We like to use a little baking powder since that’s how Lisa grew up eating and preparing them, but you may also use baking soda, which is far more prevalent in North American kitchens than it is in German ones.
Information about nutrition:

Serving Size: 2 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size: 1 Serving Size 459 calories 20g total fat 7g Saturated Fat 0g trans fat 12 g of unsaturated fat 209 milligrams of cholesterol 293 mg sodium 53 g carbohydrate 2 g fiber 0 g sugar 16 g protein

An online nutrition calculator was used to determine this nutritional information. It should only be used as a guideline and not as a substitute for expert dietary guidance.

How did this recipe turn out for you?

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Pancakes are a breakfast food that is very popular in Germanic countries. They are easy to make, quick to eat and highly nutritious. They can be served plain or with many different toppings.. Read more about savory pfannkuchen recipe and let us know what you think.

Frequently Asked Questions

Whats the difference between crêpes and Pfannkuchen?

Crêpes are made from flour, eggs, and milk. Pfannkuchen is made from a batter of flour, eggs, milk, salt, sugar and butter.

Is German pancake from Germany?

I am not sure what you mean by German pancake from Germany.

What is the difference between crêpes and German pancakes?

Crêpes are thin pancakes that are usually made with wheat flour, whereas German pancakes are thicker and made with a combination of wheat flour and rye flour.