Bacon fat flour tortillas are a delicious, fat-rich snack made with almond flour, which adds a robust flavor to tacos, fajitas, and more. They are extremely easy to make, and we usually only make them when we are feeling especially hungry and craving a tasty, fatty treat. But just how do you make these delicious tortillas? We have a few tips for you.

I have made these a couple of times in the past. I have never tried regular flour tortillas. My first batch of these were made with bacon fat.  I found that these pancakes were a little more open to leaks in the oven.  So I switched to butter.  This time I made a double batch, and I halved the amount of butter I use.

Our most popular tortilla recipe ever! These tortillas were so popular that we even decided to offer them as a product. This recipe is the first one that we added to our online store, and we are still selling them in stores!

Leftover bacon drippings were used to make homemade flour tortillas. They are much superior than any store-bought tortilla!

I’ve mastered my flour tortilla recipe after many attempts and taste tests! Making your own tortillas is well worth the additional work, in my opinion.

It takes some skill to make the dough and roll the tortillas, but even if they aren’t exactly round, they will taste great!

All-purpose flour, bacon grease, salt, and boiling water are required.

Soft, airy flour tortillas may be made with only four basic ingredients.

Large glass bowl of flour, and small bowls of bacon fat, salt, and water.

For this recipe, use white all-purpose flour. I’m aware that whole wheat flour has variances, but I haven’t tried this recipe with different flours.

When I fry bacon in a pan, I let the grease cool before straining it into a glass jar with a fine mesh strainer and storing it in the fridge. If you don’t have any leftover bacon grease, lard will suffice.

Salt- I experimented with 1 teaspoon of salt and 1.5 teaspoons of salt. The 1.5 teaspoon provided more taste, but if you’re watching your salt consumption, 1 teaspoon would enough.

Hot water is necessary to assist develop the gluten and make the dough easier to shape. If you’re kneading the dough with your hands, be sure the water isn’t boiling.

The water may be boiling if you’re using a stand mixer with a dough attachment.

Overhead view of tortillas on a plate.

Kneading the Dough (Kneading the Dough)

I demonstrate how to knead the dough by hand in the video. This is the conventional technique, but I’ve discovered that a stand mixer with the hook attachment works just as well and is less taxing on your hands.

Hand Method: Mix 3 cups flour and salt in a big mixing basin using your hands. Small bits of bacon grease should be added to the flour to ensure that it is uniformly distributed. Then, using your hands, combine everything.

Half of the hot water should be added, and you should start mixing with your hands gently. Wait a few minutes if it’s too hot. Continue to combine with your hands, adding additional water as needed, until a dough ball forms.

Add a little flour if the dough is too sticky, and additional water if it’s too dry.

Knead the dough in the bowl or on a clean work surface until it forms a smooth ball.

Hand holding tortillas inside the warmer.

Add flour, salt, and bacon grease to a stand mixer fitted with a hook attachment. To integrate, mix on low speed.

Slowly pour in hot water while mixing on low speed.

Increase the mixer’s speed to medium. Add a little flour if the dough is too sticky, and additional water if it’s too dry.

Continue to mix until you have a smooth ball.

Getting The Dough Portioned

Separate the dough into separate balls to begin. To give a better guidance, I utilized a kitchen scale for precise measurement.

I used 50g of dough to make big burrito-size tortillas.

I used 25 g of dough to make tiny taco-size tortillas.

Once all of the dough has been portioned out, I put a little oil onto my palms and massage the tops of the dough balls to prevent them from drying out. Allow to rest for 20 minutes after covering with a clean kitchen towel.

Stack of tortillas on a white plate

During the waiting period, I clean up my work area and prepare it for the rolling process. To roll out the tortillas, you’ll need some additional all-purpose flour.

I also start preheating my griddle or pan now, so it’ll be nice and hot when it’s time to cook the tortillas.

Tortillas are being rolled out.

If you’ve never rolled dough before, it will take some practice. Unlike corn tortillas, which can be rolled out with a press, flour tortillas must be rolled out by hand.

On a clean surface, sprinkle a pinch of flour and additional flour on your rolling pin. Slightly flatten one of the portioned dough balls on the floured board.

Begin rolling and going over all of the tortilla’s edges with equal pressure. Add a bit extra flour if the tortilla is sticking. You don’t want too much since it will dry out the tortilla.

Continue rolling until it is as thin as possible. Don’t worry if your circle isn’t perfect; they’ll still taste delicious!

Tortillas in the Oven

My tortillas are cooked on a cast iron griddle. You may also use a comal. Remove the pan from the heat and do not add additional oil. The fat in the tortillas is sufficient to keep it from sticking.

Preheat the pan over medium heat to begin. You want it to be heated, but not to the point of smoking.

Place your tortilla in the heated pan once it has been rolled out. It should start boiling up after approximately 10-20 seconds. Cook for 30 seconds on one side before flipping it over and cooking for another 30 seconds. Depending on how hot your pan is, the time may vary. You want some charring but not to be burnt.

Tortillas stacked in a brown tortilla warmer with a white cloth inside.

Remove the tortilla from the pan and wrap it in a clean cloth before placing it in a tortilla warm bag or a big zip top bag. Tortillas will dry out if they are left out.

Wrapping the tortillas in plastic enables the heat to steam them, making them even softer. Cook all of the tortillas and keep them warm until ready to serve.

Allow leftover tortillas to cool completely before storing them in a zip-top bag in the refrigerator for up to a week. Tortillas may also be frozen and thawed in the refrigerator after being frozen in a zip top bag. Reheat on a comal or in a skillet.

My Bacon and Egg Burritos with freshly cooked flour tortillas are a must-try.

Here’s the link to the full YouTube video:

Text overlay saying 'flour tortillas' on 2 images of stacked tortillas.

If you try this recipe, please leave a review and a star rating in the comments section below. I really appreciate it!

Stack of tortillas on a white plate

Tortillas with Bacon Fat and Flour

Renee Fuentes is a model and actress.

Leftover bacon drippings were used to make homemade flour tortillas. They are much superior than any store-bought tortilla!

45-minute prep time

15 minutes to prepare

1 hour total time

Side Dish for the Course

Mexican cuisine

Instructions 

  • Mix flour and salt in a large mixing basin using your hands. Then, using your hands, stir in the bacon grease in tiny bits to thoroughly distribute it throughout the flour. Half of the hot water should be added, and you should start mixing with your hands gently. Wait a few minutes if it’s too hot. Continue to combine with your hands, adding additional water as needed, until a dough ball forms.

  • Add a little flour if the dough is too sticky, and additional water if it’s too dry. Knead the dough in the bowl or on a clean work surface until it forms a smooth ball.

  • Mix flour, salt, and bacon grease in a stand mixer fitted with a hook attachment. To integrate, mix on low speed. Slowly pour in hot water while mixing on low speed. Increase the mixer’s speed to medium. Add a little flour if the dough is too sticky, and additional water if it’s too dry. Continue to mix until you have a smooth ball.

  • Make separate balls out of the dough. To give a better guidance, I utilized a kitchen scale for precise measurement. I used 50g of dough to make big burrito-size tortillas. I used 25 g of dough to make tiny taco-size tortillas. Once all of the dough has been portioned out, I put a little oil onto my palms and massage the tops of the dough balls to prevent them from drying out. Allow to rest for 20 minutes after covering with a clean kitchen towel.

  • Allow a griddle or skillet to heat up for 10 minutes over medium heat. Remove the pan from the heat and do not add additional oil.

  • On a clean surface, sprinkle a pinch of flour and additional flour on your rolling pin. Slightly flatten one of the portioned dough balls on the floured board. Begin rolling and going over all of the tortilla’s edges with equal pressure. Add a bit extra flour if the tortilla is sticking. You don’t want to use too much flour since it will dry up the tortilla. Continue rolling until it is as thin as possible. Don’t worry if your circle isn’t perfect; they’ll still taste delicious!

  • Place your tortilla in the heated pan once it has been rolled out. It should start boiling up after approximately 10-20 seconds. Cook for 30 seconds on one side before flipping it over and cooking for another 30 seconds. Depending on how hot your pan is, the time may vary. You want some charring but not to be burnt. Remove the tortilla from the pan and wrap it in a clean cloth before placing it in a tortilla warm bag or a big zip top bag. Tortillas will dry out if they are left out.

  • Wrapping the tortillas in plastic enables the heat to steam them, making them even softer. Cook all of the tortillas and keep them covered in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Allow leftover tortillas to cool completely before storing them in a zip-top bag in the refrigerator for up to a week. Tortillas may also be frozen in a zip-top bag and then thawed in the fridge. Return to a skillet to reheat.

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This is going to be a bit of a different kind of post because it’s not a recipe. I hope you’re not opposed to some healthy fats, since this is the focus of this post – and we do need to eat some fats. But I don’t want to get into the details of that in this post, I just want to talk about this new flour.. Read more about bacon tortilla wrap and let us know what you think.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use bacon fat instead of lard?

Bacon fat is not a suitable substitute for lard. Lard is a type of rendered pig fat, and bacon fat is just the fats from the meat of the pig.

Why are flour tortillas so bad for you?

Flour tortillas are bad for you because they contain a lot of calories and carbohydrates, which can lead to weight gain.

What is the best fat to use in tortillas?

Corn flour is the best fat to use in tortillas.

Related Tags

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